Winter and fall days in the Bay Area are synonymous with light precipitation and dense cloud

Winter and fall days in the Bay Area are synonymous with light precipitation and dense cloud coverage… for what seems like forever. But a new federal climate report shows that California could be in for a dry few months and even some drought-like conditions in some regions. According to forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), via the Chronicle, the Golden State could be in for a parched few months with central California perhaps getting the worst of it. Without either an El Niño or La Niña this year, coupled with expected warmer-than-average fall and winter temperatures, it’s reason enough for some weather experts to raise an eyebrow. “It’s something to keep an eye out on and see how the winter progresses,” said one of NOAA’s climate experts David Miskus, a meteorologist at the federal agency’s Climate Prediction Center, to the Chronicle. “By February and March, it might become wet again.” However, due to a previously predicted “Polar Coaster” by the ever-so clairvoyant Farmers’ Almanac, Californians can still expect pendulous ebbs and flows in both temperature and rainfall over this year’s fall and winter seasons. (But don’t worry,...

Hot and dry streak means increased risk of fire | News

PADUCAH — It’s been more than three weeks since Paducah has seen measurable rain. And with the hot and dry streak comes the increased risk of fire. “As the moisture level goes down, the flammability of the vegetation goes up,” said Paducah Assistant Fire Chief Jody Burton. Burton said that can lead to grass fires and brush fires when people toss out their cigarette butts. The Paducah Fire Department has responded to those types of fires periodically. “Primarily on roadways, grass fires will take place that can be caused by cigarettes. And a lot of times, we’ll have mulch catch on fire at building entrances where people discard their cigarettes as they go in the building,” said Burton. Even if people toss their cigarette butts on the pavement, Burton said, “That’s still not a good thing to do. They can be blown off the road by passing vehicles. They just need to be disposed of properly.” By that, Burton means either putting cigarette butts in a vehicle’s ash tray or in the receptacles at the entrances of buildings. A grass fire happened earlier this week at the old Farley Elementary School sign. Many of the bricks are ch...